“Where Do We Go From Here?” by Pheonyx Roldan Smith


RECENTLY

  On Thursday, 11/24/11 (Thanksgiving Day), Eric Anthony Crew, founder of AquarianPhilosophy,com, posted to The OCG Awareness Project 365 Facebook page:
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‎”It is with mixed emotion that I stand here to share my thoughts. This is a time of celebration for you – celebrating an anniversary of a beginning for the white man in America. A time of looking back, of reflection. It is with a heavy heart that I look back upon what happened to my People.
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“Even before the Pilgrims landed it was common practice for explorers to capture Indians, take them to Europe and sell them as slaves for 220 shillings apiece. The Pilgrims had hardly explored the shores of Cape Cod for four days before they had robbed the graves of my ancestors and stolen their corn and beans. Mourt’s Relation describes a searching party of sixteen men. Mourt goes on to say that this party took as much of the Indians’ winter provisions as they were able to carry.”Massasoit, the great Sachem of the Wampanoag, knew these facts, yet he and his People welcomed and befriended the settlers of the Plymouth Plantation. Perhaps he did this because his Tribe had been depleted by an epidemic. Or his knowledge of the harsh oncoming winter was the reason for his peaceful acceptance of these acts. This action by Massasoit was perhaps our biggest mistake. We, the Wampanoag, welcomed you, the white man, with open arms, little knowing that it was the beginning of the end; that before 50 years were to pass, the Wampanoag would no longer be a free people.
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“What happened in those short 50 years? What has happened in the last 300 years? History gives us facts and there were atrocities; there were broken promises – and most of these centered around land ownership. Among ourselves we understood that there were boundaries, but never before had we had to deal with fences and stone walls. But the white man had a need to prove his worth by the amount of land that he owned. Only ten years later, when the Puritans came, they treated the Wampanoag with even less kindness in converting the souls of the so-called “savages.” Although the Puritans were harsh to members of their own society, the Indian was pressed between stone slabs and hanged as quickly as any other “witch.”
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“And so down through the years there is record after record of Indian lands taken and, in token, reservations set up for him upon which to live. The Indian, having been stripped of his power, could only stand by and watch while the white man took his land and used it for his personal gain. This the Indian could not understand; for to him, land was survival, to farm, to hunt, to be enjoyed. It was not to be abused. We see incident after incident, where the white man sought to tame the “savage” and convert him to the Christian ways of life. The early Pilgrim settlers led the Indian to believe that if he did not behave, they would dig up the ground and unleash the great epidemic again.

“The white man used the Indian’s nautical skills and abilities. They let him be only a seaman — but never a captain. Time and time again, in the white man’s society, we Indians have been termed “low man on the totem pole.”

“Has the Wampanoag really disappeared? There is still an aura of mystery. We know there was an epidemic that took many Indian lives – some Wampanoags moved west and joined the Cherokee and Cheyenne. They were forced to move. Some even went north to Canada! Many Wampanoag put aside their Indian heritage and accepted the white man’s way for their own survival. There are some Wampanoag who do not wish it known they are Indian for social or economic reasons.

“What happened to those Wampanoags who chose to remain and live among the early settlers? What kind of existence did they live as “civilized” people? True, living was not as complex as life today, but they dealt with the confusion and the change. Honesty, trust, concern, pride, and politics wove themselves in and out of their [the Wampanoags’] daily living. Hence, he was termed crafty, cunning, rapacious, and dirty.

“History wants us to believe that the Indian was a savage, illiterate, uncivilized animal. A history that was written by an organized, disciplined people, to expose us as an unorganized and undisciplined entity. Two distinctly different cultures met. One thought they must control life; the other believed life was to be enjoyed, because nature decreed it. Let us remember, the Indian is and was just as human as the white man. The Indian feels pain, gets hurt, and becomes defensive, has dreams, bears tragedy and failure, suffers from loneliness, needs to cry as well as laugh. He, too, is often misunderstood.

“The white man in the presence of the Indian is still mystified by his uncanny ability to make him feel uncomfortable. This may be the image the white man has created of the Indian; his “savageness” has boomeranged and isn’t a mystery; it is fear; fear of the Indian’s temperament!

“High on a hill, overlooking the famed Plymouth Rock, stands the statue of our great Sachem, Massasoit. Massasoit has stood there many years in silence. We the descendants of this great Sachem have been a silent people. The necessity of making a living in this materialistic society of the white man caused us to be silent. Today, I and many of my people are choosing to face the truth. We ARE Indians!

“Although time has drained our culture, and our language is almost extinct, we the Wampanoags still walk the lands of Massachusetts. We may be fragmented, we may be confused. Many years have passed since we have been a people together. Our lands were invaded. We fought as hard to keep our land as you the whites did to take our land away from us. We were conquered, we became the American prisoners of war in many cases, and wards of the United States Government, until only recently.

“Our spirit refuses to die. Yesterday we walked the woodland paths and sandy trails. Today we must walk the macadam highways and roads. We are uniting We’re standing not in our wigwams but in your concrete tent. We stand tall and proud, and before too many moons pass we’ll right the wrongs we have allowed to happen to us.

“We forfeited our country. Our lands have fallen into the hands of the aggressor. We have allowed the white man to keep us on our knees. What has happened cannot be changed, but today we must work towards a more humane America, a more Indian America, where men and nature once again are important; where the Indian values of honor, truth, and brotherhood prevail.

“You the white man are celebrating an anniversary. We the Wampanoags will help you celebrate in the concept of a beginning. It was the beginning of a new life for the Pilgrims. Now, 350 years later it is a beginning of a new determination for the original American: the American Indian.

“There are some factors concerning the Wampanoags and other Indians across this vast nation. We now have 350 years of experience living amongst the white man. We can now speak his language. We can now think as a white man thinks. We can now compete with him for the top jobs. We’re being heard; we are now being listened to. The important point is that along with these necessities of everyday living, we still have the spirit, we still have the unique culture, we still have the will and, most important of all, the determination to remain as Indians. We are determined, and our presence here this evening is living testimony that this is only the beginning of the American Indian, particularly the Wampanoag, to regain the position in this country that is rightfully ours.”

    •  Pheonyx Roldan Smith replied:  Thank you for sharing this often looked-over if not ignored perspective and truth for many who are a part of the “American” culture. I hold and honor these beings and the many sacrifices and devastations their culture has endured. Of course, it has not only been the indigenous natives of this country but original tribes on every single continent throughout the world have suffered by the hand of an unconscious and tyrannical body of beings in the names of kings/queens, churches and nations.

    • And thus, this is where the work begins and never ends. To understand that the shift of darkness into light requires all of us. To learn from the actions of our forefathers/mothers. To not forget but to forgive and have compassion for both sides… those who have suffered and those who created the suffering. We are all connected. not just now but have been always. and each and every one of us share a lineage to those who were pained and those who inflicted. Some of us were even there at the time of the atrocities. Some of us died by the hands of the other. Some of us were the other. But we all stem from a single source of origin, so to point the finger to one is to also point the finger at the illusion that we are separate and therefore not equally connected to all the suffering that is.
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    • It is time for us to look at what is. What was no longer exists. If we continue to carry the energy of tragedy and suffering and victimhood into this current state of being, then we do our ancestors no honor and certainly no justice in remembering what it is they went through. All things happen according to the timeline of creation. And with creation comes the consequences of man. I hope that we can rise above the atrocities of our forefathers. We must find a way to forgive. We must find away to those we have caused pain and ask for forgiveness. Ask it on behalf of those who can not ask for it now. Ask for it for all those beings on the planet who have played out the game of duality and separation.
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      Some of us remember what it was to be there. Some of us have been the red man/woman and have asked our own for forgiveness for not being brave enough or strong enough or wise enough. Some of us have gone into the Earth to ask the great Mother for healing and compassionate energy in order to forgive the white man/woman for their own injuries towards their native brothers and sisters. Those whom they could not see as equal to themselves because they were simply too blind, too unconscious to see. Some of us were that white man or woman. Some of us have also asked the Universe to clear our karma of ignorance and separation as we have come to remember our role here now on this planet. How we must find a way to teach others that there is no peace in separation. There is tolerance perhaps. Silence even so. But not peace.
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      Now is the time for great changes. Now is the time to level all fields and lay down the swords of separation and begin to plow a new field built upon a unified understanding that what we do to others we do to ourselves. To the body of the whole where beyond this plain there is no separation. We must learned to heal our own hearts in this moment. To look into the eyes of our white brother and sister and say, “I have hurt. I have suffered. But i will no more. I forgive you. But no more. It is time we live in peace and harmony. “

    • We must find a way to transmute all injuries and digressions. To heal the wounds that have been held wide open and festering with anger and resentment and sadness for way too long. We must find a way to love what is despite what has been. But not to forget the lessons we have learned. If we forget, then we are doomed to repeat them for sure. Which is why now is the time for the Great Remembering. The spirits of beings which will right the wrongs of a darker age are rising to meet the Light which is beginning to pervade this world and throughout this section the cosmos. Be blessed and know that we are all a part of the process. That under the Universal Sun and Moon and Stars that all events in life are simply a Creator expressing itself in the ultimate experiment called Life with free will and expression. And like galactic children fighting over space in the sand box, we sit upon a time of massive growth and upheaval. To realize it is time to graduate from the sand box to a place of knowing and being to parallel so many others who have gone before us on this journey through the cosmos.

      Life is but a fleeting fancy. We have all lived and died time and time over. However, though the past be influential on the path we take now, THIS is the one that counts. THIS is the only one that matters. Not the ones before it. Not the ones to follow. THIS ONE. THIS NOW. What will you do with it? How will you celebrate it? How will you heal the hurts which can hold you back from your truest and fullest point of being, be they your own or the ghosts of your forebearers? Now is the time to heal all things. There is a way. You hold the key. Find the door and walk through it. We await your arrival.
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    • Aho Mitakuye Oyasin, ♥ Pheonyx
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       Pheonyx Roldan Smith Footnote: in 2010, shortly after relocating to Asheville, NC (the heart of the former Cherokee tribes) through a series of sweat lodges and a vision quest, I regained memories of past-life Cherokee Nation Shaman/Priest and reluctant Chief during the wars with the White Man in early American colonial years. I was known by many names including “Wind Walker” “Bridge Builder” and “He Who Walks Between Worlds”. Since then, I have gained an inexplicable connection to this land and the Blue Ridge Mountains (some of the oldest mountain ranges in the world). I have had many conversations with both my ancestors from the time when I held those positions and with the energy of the Earth in this area which speaks of coming changes and offers messages of healing, some of which have been included in what I’ve just shared. We all have roots connected to ancient tribes all around the world. None of us are separate from it. We all share the responsibility for the ignorance. Just as each share in the responsibility to wake up and shift into a new way of thinking, living, seeing and being. A written piece came to/through me during a meditation shortly after my remembering. It is meant to be shared with all sentient beings. It will activate that which needs to be activated in those who are ready to hear it. blessings, pheo

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      .“The Snake & The Rabbit: The Song of Light” by Pheonyx Roldan Smith
      via theocgproject.com : “The Snake & The Rabbit: The Song of Light” by Pheonyx Roldan F. Smith Winding through the deep dark tunnels under the crust of Gaia skin, the Snake winds its way up from the Center…

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